Parent-Child Advice

Podcasts for Middle School Students

We’re continuing our three-part series on podcasts-radio that is personalized to a topic in which you are especially interested-with a list of some great podcasts for middle schoolers.  1. Welcome to Night Vale. Tune into the community radio of this desert town for the news on local weather, the mysterious lights overhead, announcements from the Sheriff’s Secret Police, a dog park that prohibits dogs, and dark hooded figures with unknowable powers. Activity to try: Challenge students…

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Podcasts for Elementary School Students

Podcasts have been growing in popularity over the past few years, and it’s more commonplace than not for adults to have a few favorites. It’s basically radio that is personalized to a topic in which you are especially interested–what’s not to like? Kids can also join in the trend! See our list below for some great podcasts for elementary age children.  1. The Radio Adventures of Eleanor Amplified: Listen as world-famous radio reporter Eleanor foils devious…

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February Break Activities 2019

Will you be working as usual over the February school break? It’s not too early to start looking for February break activities to keep your kids busy and having fun! In fact, many vacation day camps require prior registration and fill up quickly. Check out our list for some great ideas. Boston Children’s Theater: The Runaway Bunny When: Sat 2/9/19 – Sat 2/23/19 Where: 527 Tremont Street, Boston Time: 2:00 PM & 4:00 PM Age:…

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Creating Homework Rituals for Children

It’s hard to fault a child who resists doing homework. After all, she has already put in a long day at school, probably been involved in after-school activities, and, as the late afternoon spills into evening, now faces a pile of assignments. Parents feel it, too — it’s no one’s favorite time of day. But despite the bad rap, homework plays an important role in ensuring that students learn to execute tasks independently. When it’s…

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Importance of Empathy in the Classroom

Results of a recent study at the University of Michigan show a troubling trend in regards to bullying and empathy in US classrooms. Over the past three decades, empathy among teens has dropped nearly 40 percent, and 1 in 3 students report experiencing bullying at least once. In light of these stats, it’s clear that cultivating and restoring empathy should be a priority in school. Here are four tips for educators looking to create more…

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Holiday Break Tips for Students Away from Home

The holidays are a special season filled with food, family, friends, and fun, but what do students do when they cannot head back home for the holiday break? Follow these tips if you find yourself far from home this season. Try to begin with coping and realization. We realize that this is easier said than done, but all in all, students should realize that they are not the only one spending a holiday break alone.…

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Self Care for Students Over the Holidays

Students and teachers are enjoying winter break, and excitement is running high! It is hard to believe we have completed the first four months of school and we are approaching a new year. After the winter performances and class parties are over, we spend time with the people we love to ring in the new year. It’s so important to keep self care in mind throughout this time.  One challenge of the holiday season is…

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Holiday Traditions to Start with Your Family

The whole month of December is always busy. Between shopping, parties, finishing up school, and the usual festivities, the month seems to fly by! Here are 25 ideas for new holiday traditions you can start this year with your family to spread some holiday cheer.  Cookie exchange party. Every guest brings a batch of their favorite holiday cookies to share with the rest of the party guests.  Go Christmas caroling. Bring along some hot chocolate…

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How Parents Can Help their Teens with Sleep

Studies show that the average teenager requires 9 to 9.5 hours of sleep per night, but she typically only gets 7. It’s becoming more and more common for the normal life of the average American high schooler to interfere with sleep. In a recent poll of 2,000 parents, 1 in 6 said their teen experiences frequent sleep problems, here defined as “having trouble falling asleep or staying asleep 3 or more nights per week.” More…

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Brain Development in Young Children

Ron Ferguson, an economist at Harvard, has made a career out of studying the achievement gap, which is the well-documented learning gap that exists between kids of different races and socioeconomic statuses. He was surprised to discover that this gap is visible with stark differences by just age 2, meaning kids who aren’t even halfway to kindergarten are already well behind their peers. And yet, there’s a whole body of research on how caregivers can encourage…

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