Teachers

Tips for Grading Student Work

Time demands on teachers seems to be ever-growing, so any way to speed up the grading process is worth exploring. One approach to this is the use of verbal feedback, a quick and effective method when done correctly. Like all learning feedback, comments must be directed towards developing and acknowledging skill and give students tangible understandings of how to progress, or specific comments identifying what was good about the work they produced. Let’s look at…

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Benefits of a Building a Classroom Website

It’s understandable if creating a classroom website has been at the low end of your priority list. Maybe you have been thinking about building one for a while, but who has the time? Unfortunately, classroom websites too often take the backseat. Either the website is too complicated to update on a regular basis and ends up being neglected, or perhaps you’re underwhelmed by the district issued site. Before you brush off the idea of creating…

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Looping Classrooms: A New Educational Trend

Looping classrooms have become more and more popular in the US in recent years. Looping is when a teacher moves with his or her students at the end of the year to the next grade level rather than sending them to a new teacher. In many schools, looping has been integrated as a regular procedure  and has become normal for students to spend more than one year with the same teacher(s). Of course, as with…

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Writing Workshops for the Classroom

Getting feedback on schoolwork is an essential part of how students learn, but the current method for students receiving this feedback only from their teachers holds students back. Too often students turn in work to a teacher for a grade and then immediately move on to the next big assignment, without giving the project much thought after the due date. Additionally, teachers spend a lot of time evaluating student work, but many students barely glance…

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Using Infographics in Literature

Some teachers are turning to infographics in the classroom because the way students experience literature is changing. Web writing, advertising, YouTube, Snapchat, and Vine are condensing the story, and increasingly short pieces dot the student landscape. Whether they’re reading, predicting, or decoding a piece of classical literature or writing and producing short bits for their YouTube channels, the craft of story is still critical. Good stories have universal themes that can apply anywhere with the…

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Things to Look For in Modern Classrooms

What are the kinds of things you should look for in today’s classroom? The common response often begins and ends with technology, but it’s not all about the technology. We’ve listed here things to look for in modern classrooms in addition to technology. Let us know in the comments which you think is the most important, or if you’re a teacher, which you’d like to focus on in your classroom during the new school year.…

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Teaching Conflict Resolution to Children

Conflicts are a familiar part of everyday life in elementary school classrooms. Children today are quick to involve adults when problems arise, however, as they have become accustomed to constant adult supervision. While there is nothing wrong with seeking direction, especially when they feel uncomfortable, by doing this the children are learning nothing about doing the conflict resolution themselves, or about preventing conflicts from happening in the first place. This is why it is important…

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Understanding Students with Technology

Teachers need to hear from their students in order to do their jobs well. In the process of understanding students, it is essential for them to find out exactly what students are thinking, what questions they might have, and what their needs are. Student feedback also helps guide teachers with their instruction. Thankfully, there are many ways to ask questions and myriad methods of gathering information from students today. It’s no longer necessary to even…

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Top Three Teaching Myths

Teaching is certainly rewarding work, but many people don’t realize that it is also time-intensive and can be emotionally exhausting. As the daughter of a public school teacher, I will often hear my mother’s non-teaching friends express envy over an “easy” work schedule, ending at 3pm every weekday, and annual summer vacations from “glorified babysitting.” These misinformed comments regarding the teaching profession can go a long way toward devaluing what teachers actually do on a…

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Do’s and Don’ts of Teaching Vocabulary

Since the adoption of Common Core in the US, teaching vocabulary is no longer strictly the domain of the English-Language Arts classroom. This makes vocabulary a matter of standard and law, so it’s pretty important to make the most of vocab lessons. Here are some simple do’s and don’ts when it comes to teaching vocabulary.  DO help students come up with their own definitions. Studies show that students are much more likely to retain meaning…

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